2021-06-18

Minister's Post, Fri Jun 18

In prayer, we take a moment to solemnly remind ourselves of our purposes and our gratitude, that they may guide and affirm our actions and our being. Will you, then, pray with me?

This Week's Prayer

Dear Earth and Waters, Air and Sky,

We do not see love the way that we see a tree.

Love is an interpretation of what we see and hear – maybe smell, in the case of a meal being lovingly prepared, and taste.

Love is an interpretation of feelings that may arise in us, those feelings that seem to pull us forward and toward.

Let us then interpret you, Earth, waters, air, and sky, as extravagantly pouring out your love upon us.

Let us understand you as drenching and anointing all of creation.

And out of love for us, you gave us a home and brought forth astounding beauty.

We might even add, in our imaginations, that you called it good.

Standing, sittling, rolling, or lying in the midst of your vast love, we pray in gratitude.

Ford Motor Company is now producing more electric Mustang Mach-Es than gas-powered Mustangs. Thank you.

General Motors, Honda, Volvo, and Jaguar have promised to stop selling gas cars altogether by 2040. Thank you.

Royal Dutch Shell was court-ordered last month to cut its emissions. Thank you.

Shareholders just forced Exxon to replace a quarter of its board with climate-concerned activist investors. Thank you.

The International Energy Agency this year called solar “the cheapest electricity in history.” Costs of solar and batteries in the United States are one-tenth what they were a decade ago, and the cost of wind energy has fallen 70 percent. Thank you to all who were part of making that happen.

In 2020, 20 percent of US electricity came from renewables. Thank you.

US greenhouse gas emissions last year were down 21 percent from their all-time high. Thank you.

Let our love for you, dear planet, return your love for us.

We also give thanks that the Federal Government this week recognized Juneteenth as a Federal holiday. Thank you. And let us be inspired by this day that marks the liberation of all, and let there be a season of repentance, reconstruction, and reparation, for indeed we are not free – none of us -- until we are all free.

In prayer, we also acknowledge that at times we feel cast at sea – unmoored and lost.

We pray for all who worry about the safety of their children and loved ones.

Let there be a way toward peace be found in the Middle East.

We ask of ourselves the mindful intention to delight in what is good, to confront what is cruel, to heal what is broken.

Amen.

Covid Review

Worldwide.
The Worldwide numbers are not reliable, and likely are greatly underestimating the actual prevalence of Covid-19. These numbers may nevertheless give us an indication of trends.

7DMA of new cases per day, worldwide, as of Jun 10: 385,156
The rate has been falling for the last 6 weeks, but is still above what it gotten down to as of Feb 20.

7DMA of deaths per day, worldwide, as of Jun 10: 10,128
This, too, has been falling since May 1, but is still above 8,605 (where it was as of Mar 12, three months ago).

United States.
7DMA of new cases per day, US, as of Jun 10: 13,536
This is the lowest it's been since first breaking above 13,000 as of Mar 28, 2020.

7DMA of deaths per day, US, as of Jun 10: 383
Back on Mar 30, 2020, this number reached 491, and has been above that from Mar 30, 2020 until May 31, 2021. Since May 31, though, the number has stayed below the rate first seen over 14 months ago.

It's not over. We're still losing almost 400 people a day to Covid in this country, and over 10,000 worldwide.

ICYMI ("In Case You Missed It")

Here's the Jun 6: "R.E. Sunday"



Practice of the Week

Last week’s slogan was “Do What You Can.” This week: Don’t do what you can’t. In other words, Accept the Limits of your Influence.

You can't change the past. Your influence on the future is very limited. You have little influence over other people’s thoughts or actions or over the economy, or government policies, or international affairs. When faced with some fact you can't change — like you're stuck in traffic, or you feel sad, or your young daughter has just poured milk on the floor — ask yourself, Can I accept that this is the way it is, whether I like it or not? Acceptance does not mean approval, acquiescence, overlooking, or forgiveness. It just means facing reality. Notice the good feelings that come with acceptance, even if there are also painful feelings about various facts. Notice that acceptance usually brings you more resources for dealing with life's difficulties. If you simply cannot accept a fact — that it exists, that it has happened, whatever your preferences may be — then see if you can accept the fact that you cannot accept the fact! For more about this, see the post, Accept the Limits of Your Influence.

See also our SPIRITUAL PRACTICE DIRECTORY

2021-06-16

Nature Practice

Practice of the Week
Nature Practice

Category: ECOSPIRITUAL

When I’ve asked Unitarians what their spiritual practice is, answers are all over the place. One of the more common answers is Walking in the Woods.

Connecting to nature is indeed a vital spirituality. Spirituality is about being a part of something bigger than yourself – the context of belonging that imparts meaning to life. Earth and sky, mountains and waters, trees and animals – and all their complex interrelationships – fits the bill.

Nature Practice can be just what we need, as Dr. Winfield Sedhoff explains:
Modern living is tough. There’s just too much to do! Too many people to please, too many tasks to complete, and too many fears and disappointments to deal with. It can be exhausting, frustrating, and soul-destroying all at once, and that can be on a good day!
Along the way, all too easily, we can lose our sense of self – who am I when I’m not a parent, a friend, or a worker? Do I have any idea anymore? When it all gets on top of us, when we no longer recognise, or like, the person in the mirror, this is when we need a way to rejuvenate from within.
Increasing our spiritual connection with nature, as our ancient tribal ancestors did, can be the vital tonic we need. (Sedhoff)
Here are some entry-level nature spiritual practice that anyone can do.


Sit for 5 minutes (or longer) each morning (or evening) and look at whatever you can see from the best window in your home. Use patio, deck, or sun porch in good weather. Be still. Notice what you might not have seen before. Be curious like a child. Be grateful. Take a deep breath and say thank you before continuing with your day. Add a reading from Wisdom literature on days when you have time.

Go on a short walk in your yard or neighborhood. Appreciate each sign of life and beauty. Stop and look closely at small things. Notice details of color and shape. Be amazed at the intricate web of life in which we live and move and have our being.

When you drive to work or on an errand, don’t turn on the radio. While still driving safely, notice trees, grass, flowers, sky, wind, sun, birds, maybe crops, or rain, squirrels and any other animals. Feel blessed by all of these, because you are.

Take mini-vacations during the work day. Stop and listen, look out a window for a few minutes. Break-through, creative thoughts sometimes come in such moments of reverie or relaxed reflection.

Take a walk during a break or lunch hour. Go outside if possible and let creation bless eyes, ears, body. Give up thinking and worrying for a moment. Sense the vibrancy in all that surrounds you. Fill your lungs with fresh air. Move. Be glad to be alive in, and part of, amazing creation.

Create connections with nature in your work space. Keep plants, flowers, unique stones, fish, or a small fountain in your home or office. Play nature sound music while you work.

Use imagery to connect with nature. Take a mini-vacation in your mind by using imagination. Close your eyes, breathe deeply and calmly. Imagine the most beautiful, peaceful, sacred place you have ever seen or visited. Be there! Have a virtual reality experience that allows you to see, feel, taste, smell, and hear this place as if you were actually there. Be thankful for all such places that we carry within us because we have been gifted with such extravagant life and loveliness.

If you have a special place in nature that you can visit during the week, go there and do nothing but look, listen, and feel. Attend to what feels sacred or holy in the details and realities of this place. Offer a prayer of thanksgiving as you prepare to leave.

Sing! When we take time to notice the glory of the created world we are often moved to joy. Express your praise by singing a favorite hymn or chorus.

Speak your thoughts throughout the day with mental or verbal words/phrases. A simple “Wow!” as you see a gorgeous sunset or “Earth, you do nice work,” as you spy an incredibly colorful tree can serve to heighten our gratitude and wonder.


* * *

2021-06-14

Music: Sun Jun 20

 

Percussionist Julie Licata


Julie Licata is currently Associate Professor of Music at State University of New York, College at Oneonta where she teaches percussion ensembles, percussion and drumset lessons, and courses in world music. Over the last twenty years, Julie has presented solo percussion and chamber ensemble recitals across the US, commissioning and premiering works by rising and prominent composers from the US and beyond. Julie’s performances range from improvisational soundscapes and works with interactive computer processing, to solo marimba, orchestra and theater pit orchestra, to West African drum ensembles and Indonesian gamelan.

In addition to performing regularly with several regional orchestras and theater companies, Julie has recently presented solo and chamber performances at the Pantaleoni Concert Series in Oneonta, NY, the College Music Society Southern Regional Conference, the 10th Annual Flute Festival of Junín, Argentina, the Society for Electro-Acoustic Music in the US (SEAMUS), the International Computer Music Conference (ICMC), and CHIMEFest in Chicago, IL.

Julie is also an active member of the Percussive Arts Society, having served as a new literature reviewer for the Percussive Notes journal and as a member of the PAS University Pedagogy and Diversity Committees. Julie is also a member of the Black Swamp Percussion Educator Network and is the recent past Secretary/Treasurer and Interim President of the PAS NY Chapter. Julie holds degrees from the University of North Texas (DMA), University of South Carolina (MM), and Capital University (BM). For more information about Julie’s musical activities, please visit www.julielicata.com.

Gathering Music: Julie Licata, marimba

Prelude V for marimba (2015)
                                    Anna Ignatowicz-Gliñska

Prelude in A Minor for marimba (2006)
                                    Casey Cangelosi

Rotation #4 (1996)
                                    Eric Sammut

Centering Music:
Violin Partita No. 2 in D minor, BWV 1004
                   Corrente
                                    J. S. Bach

Opening Music:

Medley of "The Lord's Prayer" / "Amazing Grace" / "Ave Maria"

            Original arr. by Albert Hay Malotte (1934); this arr. by Julia Hillbrick (1996) 

 

Musical Meditation:
Violin Partita No. 2 in D minor, BWV 1004

            Sarabande

                                    J. S. Bach

 

Interlude:

Memories of the Seashore (1987)

                                                Keiko Abe 


Parting Music: with Ana Laura Gonzalez, flute

"Concert d'Aujourd'hui" from L'Histoire du Tango

                                                Astor Piazzolla

2021-06-11

Minister's Post, Fri Jun 11

Covid Review

Worldwide.
The Worldwide numbers are not reliable, and likely are greatly underestimating the actual prevalence of Covid-19. These numbers may nevertheless give us an indication of trends.

7DMA of new cases per day, worldwide, as of Jun 10: 385,156
The rate has been falling for the last 6 weeks, but is still above what it gotten down to as of Feb 20.

7DMA of deaths per day, worldwide, as of Jun 10: 10,128
This, too, has been falling since May 1, but is still above 8,605 (where it was as of Mar 12, three months ago).

United States.
7DMA of new cases per day, US, as of Jun 10: 13,536
This is the lowest it's been since first breaking above 13,000 as of Mar 28, 2020.

7DMA of deaths per day, US, as of Jun 10: 383
Back on Mar 30, 2020, this number reached 491, and has been above that from Mar 30, 2020 until May 31, 2021. Since May 31, though, the number has stayed below the rate first seen over 14 months ago.

It's not over. We're still losing almost 400 people a day to Covid in this country, and over 10,000 worldwide.

ICYMI ("In Case You Missed It")

Here's the Jun 6: "R.E. Sunday"



Practice of the Week

Last week’s slogan was “Do What You Can.” This week: Don’t do what you can’t. In other words, Accept the Limits of your Influence.

You can't change the past. Your influence on the future is very limited. You have little influence over other people’s thoughts or actions or over the economy, or government policies, or international affairs. When faced with some fact you can't change — like you're stuck in traffic, or you feel sad, or your young daughter has just poured milk on the floor — ask yourself, Can I accept that this is the way it is, whether I like it or not? Acceptance does not mean approval, acquiescence, overlooking, or forgiveness. It just means facing reality. Notice the good feelings that come with acceptance, even if there are also painful feelings about various facts. Notice that acceptance usually brings you more resources for dealing with life's difficulties. If you simply cannot accept a fact — that it exists, that it has happened, whatever your preferences may be — then see if you can accept the fact that you cannot accept the fact! For more about this, see the post, Accept the Limits of Your Influence.

See also our SPIRITUAL PRACTICE DIRECTORY

2021-06-10

Accept the Limits of Your Influence

Practice of the Week
Accept the Limits of Your Influence

Category: SLOGANS THAT HELP: Advertisers know that slogans work! So let's put them to a positive use. Adopting these slogans as your personal guides and reminders will help bring more peace and more joy into your life. Journaling about how you're trying to implement a given slogan will help integrate it.
“You've got to know when to hold,
Know when to fold 'em."
--Kenny Rogers


An earlier "Practice of the Week" was "Do What You Can (Unlearn Helplessness)." This week's practice is the flip side of that: Don't do (and stop trying to do and worrying about) what you can't.

Each one of us is very limited in what we can do or change. You can't change the past, or even this present moment. We can only affect the future -- and our influence there is very limited. You have little influence over other people, including their thoughts, actions, or suffering. And even less influence over the economy, government policies, or international affairs. Things happen due to causes — and of the ten thousand causes upstream of this moment, most of them are out of your control.

You don't have the power to make something happen if the prerequisites aren't present. For example, you can't grow roses without good soil and water.

If you've been pounding your head against a wall for a while, it's time to stop, accept the way it is, and move on. As I sometimes tell myself: Don't try to grow roses in a parking lot.

How

In general, when faced with some fact you can't change — like you're stuck in traffic, or you feel sad, or your young daughter has just poured milk on the floor (speaking of some of my own experiences) — ask yourself, Can I accept that this is the way it is, whether I like it or not?

Understand that acceptance does not mean approval, acquiescence, overlooking, or forgiveness. You are simply facing the facts, including the fact of your limited influence.

Notice the good feelings that come with acceptance, even if there are also painful feelings about various facts. Notice that acceptance usually brings you more resources for dealing with life's difficulties.

If you cannot accept a fact — that it exists, that it has happened, whatever your preferences may be — then see if you can accept the fact that you cannot accept the fact!

More specifically, consider these reflections:
  • Review a life event that has troubled you. See if you can accept it as something that happened, like it or not — and as truly just a part of a much larger and probably mainly positive whole.
  • Consider an aspect of your body or personality that you don't like. Tell the truth to yourself about the extent to which you can change it and make a clear choice as to what you will actually do. Then see if you can accept whatever remains as just the way it is — and as only a small part of the much larger and generally positive whole that is you.
  • Bring to mind a key person in your life. Have there been any ways that you've been trying to affect or change this person that are just not working? What limits to your influence here do you need to accept?
  • Consider something you've wanted to happen but been frustrated, about — perhaps a career shift, or a certain school working out for your child, or a sale to a new customer. Are the necessary supporting conditions truly present? If they are, then maybe stick with it and be patient. But if they are not present — if you're trying to grow roses in a parking lot — consider shifting your hopes and efforts in another direction.
For Journaling

Consider and journal your thoughts about one or more of the four bullet points above.

* * *

2021-06-08

Music: Sun Jun 13

 

The intersection of personal and social justice is embodied by the struggles of the LGBTQ community. In keeping with the spirit of Pride Month, this morning's solo piano selections highlight the work of gay composers from a wide range of time periods and cultural backgrounds. The CUUC Choir graces our service as well with the Calypso-style hymn "Turn the World Around" and the tender "Ashokan Farewell," offered as a sort of leave-taking for the summer respite. Read on for programming details, and stay tuned for spoken introductions.

 

Gathering Music: Adam Kent, piano

Suite Française

            Bransle de Bourgogne

            Pavane

            Petite marche militaire

            Complainte

            Bransle de Champagne

            Sicilienne

            Carillon

                                    Francis Poulenc

 

Centering Music:
"Slow Dance"

                                    Aaron Copland

 

Opening Music:

From Excursions, Op. 20

            II. In slow blues tempo

                                    Samuel Barber

 

Musical Meditation:
Moment Musical in Ab Major, Op. 94, No. 6

                                    Franz Schubert

 

Interlude:
June, Op. 37, No. 6

                                    Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

 

Hymn: CUUC Choir directed by Lisa N. Meyer and accompanied by Georgianna Pappas

"Turn the World Around"

                        Harry Belafonte and Robert Freedman, arr. by Mark Hayes

 

Anthem:
"Ashokan Farewell"

                        Grian McGregor and Jay Ungar, arr. by Carole Stephens

 

 

 

Parting Music:
Prelude No. 3

                                    George Gershwin

 into tribute to Lisa

2nd Hymn: CUUC Turn the World Around

Anthem: Ashokan

2021-06-04

Music: Sun Jun 6

 

Gathering Music:

            Unwritten, Natasha Bedingfield

            This Joy (Shirley Caesar), Resistance Revival Chorus

            Resilient, Rising Appalachia   

            This Little Light of Mine (Traditional Gospel), Ladysmith Black Mambazo

 

Centering Music: The Brothers (and Father) Force

"The Wellerman"

                        Traditional, arr. by Christian Force


Interlude: Lyra Harada, piano and violin

Nagasaki no Kane (Bells of Nagasaki)

            Hachiro Sato and Yuji Koseki, arr. by Lyra Harada    

 

Lyra has provided the following background information:

 

“Nagasaki no Kane (Bells of Nagasaki) was originally an essay by a radiologist named Dr. Takashi Nagai; his book was published in 1949, four years after the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The essay and the life of Dr. Nagai became the inspiration for the movie of the same title with the theme being the titular song, with music and lyrics by Hachiro Sato and music by Yuji Koseki; the movie was released in 1950, just one year before Dr. Nagai died of leukemia. 

The premiere of Koseki’s “Olympic March” at the Opening Ceremony of the 1964 Tokyo Olympics made Koseki the first composer of color and the first Japanese composer to have his original music featured in an Olympic Game. Koseki also made history as the first Japanese composer to have won a composition competition hosted by a small publishing firm in the UK with his now lost symphonic poem, “Princess Kaguya.” Unfortunately, he wasn’t able to go study in the UK as part of his prize since the competition was held just as the Great Depression occurred. 

The music starts out in a minor key signifying the great tragedy and loss that was a result of the atomic bomb, even going as far as expressing a death of a wife as direct reference to Dr. Nagai, whose wife died in a fire at their home after the bomb dropped. However, the music changes to the original key’s parallel key signifying the optimism that there will be peace. The bells mentioned in the song refers to the bells that once stood in the Urakami Cathedral Church in Nagasaki City. Unfortunately, the original church was almost completely destroyed as a result of the atomic bomb, but the bells were miraculously found with no severe damages on the night of Christmas Eve in 1945. The bells became a symbol of hope for many regardless of their faith. Seventy-two years after the song’s release, it has proven to a song of hope during the Covid-19 pandemic and as well as constant signal to everyone that there will be not just peace within society but also inner peace for every individual. 

Lyrics with Romanized Japanese and English Translation:

こよなく晴れた 青空を
悲しと思う せつなさよ
うねりの波の 人の世に
はかなく生きる 野の花よ 

なぐさめ はげまし 長崎の
ああ 長崎の鐘が鳴る 

召されて妻は 天国へ
別れてひとり 旅立ちぬ
かたみに残る ロザリオの
鎖に白き わが涙 

なぐさめ はげまし 長崎の
ああ 長崎の鐘が鳴る 

こころの罪を うちあけて
更けゆく夜の 月すみぬ
貧しき家の 柱にも
気高く白き マリア様 

なぐさめ はげまし 長崎の
ああ 長崎の鐘が鳴る 

Koyonaku hareta aozora wo
Kanashi to o-mou setsunasa yo
U-neri no Nami no Hito-no-yo-ni
Hakanaku ikiru no-no hana yo 

Nagusame Hagemashi Nagasaki no
Ah-Ah Nagasaki no
Kane ga Naru 

Mesarete tsuma wa Tengoku-e
Wakarete hitori tabi dachi-nu
Katami ni nokoru rozario no
Kusari ni shiroki waga namida 

Nagusame Hagemashi Nagasaki no
Ah-Ah Nagasaki no
Kane ga Naru 

Kokoro no tsumi wo uchi-akete
Fuke yuku yoru no tsuki sumi-nu
Mabushiki ie no hashira ni mo
Kedakaku shiroki Maria-sama 

Nagusame Hagemashi Nagasaki no
Ah-Ah Nagasaki no
Kane ga Naru 

On a clear sunny day,
Deep sorrow engulfs me.
For I am just a flower
Alone in this world. 

May you bring comfort to us,
The Bells of Nagasaki
Ah - The Bells of Nagasaki
Will forever ring! 

My wife has left me all alone
To be with the Lord.
I can only see remnants of my tears
On the chains of the rosary
She leaves behind. 

May you bring comfort to us,
The Bells of Nagasaki
Ah - The Bells of Nagasaki
Will forever ring! 

On a black, dark night
With only the Moon to be my Light
I confess my sins.
From the pillars of my humble home
The Virtuous Virgin Mary still stands. 

May you bring comfort to us,
The Bells of Nagasaki.
Ah - The Bells of Nagasaki
Will forever ring!


Bridging Music: Wesley Miller, piano

A Wild and Distant Shore

                       Michael Nyman

IV. "For Helen Coates" from Four Anniversaries

                       Leonard Bernstein



8 Principles Songs: R.E. Students and Alums, with Laura Sehdeva and Adam Kent

Based on melodies from:

"Do You Hear the People Sing?" from Les Misérables

                      Claude Michel Schonberg


"Seasons of Love" from Rent

                        Jonathan Larson


"My Favorite Things" from The Sound of Music

                        Richard Rogers

                       

 

Parting Music: Adam Kent, piano

Scenas Infantis (Scenes of Childhood)

I. Run, run!

II. Ring around the Rosie

III. March, Little Soldier!
IV. Sleeping Time

V. The Hobby-Horse

                                    Octavio Pinto 


I.

The garden is full of life.

In the sunshine children run about 
Gaily and noisily. 

Outside, on the street,

The poor blind man with his hand-organ 
Sings his sorrows.

II.

"Let's play ring-around-the-rosie,"

Says little Anna Maria.

Quickly they form a ring

Singing and dancing.


III.

At the other corner, 
Little Luiz Octavio comes marching by,
With his men, in paper hats,
Carrying wooden guns.


IV.

The sun falls down the west,

Six times sings the Cuckoo in the clock.

The little girls sing lullabies,

Sing that their dollies must go to sleep

Before the bogey-man comes!

V.

And now play-time is over, 
And the children 
Come prancing happily home 
On their wooden hobby-horses.

 

2021-05-27

Religious Education: May 27, 2021

*|MC:SUBJECT|*
Religious Education & Faith Development
Community Unitarian Universalist Congregation at White Plains
May 27, 2021
2020-2021 Religious Education (RE) theme: JUSTICE & EQUITY
Supporting our young people in understanding justice issues, articulating their values, and engaging in faith in action with CUUC Social Justice teams. Also, supporting youth in developing healthy self-esteem and relationships. 
Sunday, May 30th
Worship 10:00am  

Rev. Meredith Garmon, “Why Remember?" 
100 years have passed since the Tulsa Massacre of 1921. We remember atrocities -- even if we feel in little danger of repeating them -- for many reasons. Because there is celebration amidst the grieving: that we, as a people, have survived even this. Because the seeds that produced past wrong are ever within the human breast and must be continually recognized and not ignored. Because the honoring of the lives lost, and their accomplishments, assures evil's triumph is not final. Click here for additional resources shared by our In the Spirit of Truth/Racial Justice Team.
Note for Parents & Caregivers

The Time for All Ages story in worship this Sunday is Unspeakable: The Tulsa Race Massacre by Carole Boston Weatherford, illustrated by Floyd Cooper. Amy Nathan reads it for us. This picture book sensitively introduces young readers to the tragedy and concludes with a call for a better future. It is a telling of what happened in Tulsa on Black Wall Street in 1921 in a way that is appropriate for children. 

There are some words you might need to explain to young children. One passage reads, “Fearing the man would be lynched - killed by a mob...” For young children who ask what “lynched” means, explaining that as hurting someone very badly or killing them is probably sufficient. There is also reference to reconciliation and terms of the time like “soda fountain,” “pool hall,” and women getting their hair “coiffed.” 

In current times, when we see some states trying to limit teaching about this country’s history of slavery and the systems that were created to perpetuate ongoing oppression of people of color, it is important that we are voices of truth. For many years, many children did not learn this part of history in school. An excerpt from the NBC News story below describes the attitudes of some education officials: 

"The curriculum was never designed to be anything other than white supremacist," Julian Hayter, a historian and an associate professor at the University of Richmond in Virginia, said, "and it has been very difficult to convince people that other versions of history are not only worth telling. They’re absolutely essential for us as a country to move closer to something that might reflect reconciliation but even more importantly, the truth."

Ask what questions your children have and let that lead your discussion. Approach conversations in age appropriate ways and follow your children’s lead. You might find these resources helpful: 

The CUUC In The Spirit of Truth/Racial Justice Team shared additional resources here

Click here to join our Sunday Worship Service 
Phone in (audio only): 646-876-9923 · Webinar: 761 321 991 · Passcode: 468468

Join Virtual Coffee Hour after worship, 
Meeting: 336 956 2210 · Passcode: 468468

No Classes

Religious Education (RE) classes do
not meet this Sunday. 

Connecting in Community
Announcements and Resources
for Children, Youth, Young Adults, CUUC, LGBTQIA+ 
& BIPOC & Our Local Communities, Plus Summer Camps

Click Here for All Announcements & Resources

A Few Highlights Listed Below

How to De-Escalate Situations and Be a Better Bystander/Upstander
NPR Life Kit offers these resources for how to intervene when someone is harassed or attacked. The resource is presented like a graphic novel and include a recorded segment. Parents/caregivers might want to listen to the recorded segment first or read the transcript, then decide if it's appropriate for your child's age and stage. 

FREE Hollaback! Bystander Intervention Resources

 

Knowing how to safely intervene when you see harassment is a valuable skill. Hollaback! trainings offer methodologies in the areas of bystander intervention, conflict de-escalation, harassment prevention, and resilience. We encourage you to attend their FREE online trainings, listed on their website.  Trainings are great for all ages (your whole family can listen in together) and include Bystander Intervention 2.0: Conflict De-Escalation, How to Respond to Harassment for People Experiencing Anti-Asian/American Harassment, Bystander Intervention to Stop Anti-Asian/American Harassment and Xenophobia, Bystander Intervention to Stop Anti-Asian/American Harassment and Xenophobia, Stand Up Against Street Harassment.  Visit these great resources from Hollaback!

Countering Bias

The Southern Poverty Law Center’s (SPLC) Learning for Justice project (formerly Teaching for Tolerance) released a new short video designed to offer an age-appropriate way to talk with young people about what countering bias looks like in practice. The video, made for children, is great for all ages.

An original children’s story from author, educator and LFJ awardee Elizabeth Kleinrock, Min Jee’s Lunchwas published in the fall of 2020 in response to increased reports of racism around the coronavirus. You can watch Min Jee’s Lunch here [4:32]. Accompanying reader questions can be found here. In the story, a classmate announces that Min Jee’s Korean lunch is “how everyone got sick.” Min Jee and her friends must decide how to respond. We know young people face decisions like this every day. The organization Stop AAPI Hate recently announced that reports of hate incidents targeting Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have increased dramatically this spring—including in schools. SPLC developed this short video, beautifully illustrated by Janice Chang and read by Kleinrock, to help start conversations about ways to push back against hate and speak up for what is right.

Community Unitarian Universalist Congregation at White Plains  
468 Rosedale Ave · White Plains, NY 10605-5419