News for

May 31 - Jun 6: e-CommunitarianMinisterREMusicOtherCUUC Shrine of Vows

2020-06-28

White Privilege

A few years ago, J.B.W. Tucker -- a white male writer who writes mostly about "reclaiming conservative theology" -- assembled on his blog what he called "the ultimate white privilege post."

With careful footnotes on all his sources, he presents the hard (in every sense of the word) data in 11 categories:
  1. Police,
  2. the War on Drugs
  3. Prison (Mass Incarceration)
  4. Criminal Justice/Courts
  5. Education
  6. Employment
  7. Wealth
  8. Workplace
  9. Voting
  10. Media
  11. Housing
In each of these categories, Tucker compiled the extensive documentation of how advantageous it is to merely be white in the US.

Please read, or re-read, Tucker's full post, which is now here

https://www.thenewprogressive.net/ultimate-white-privilege-statistics/

Tucker's work is now several years old. For an update of some of those figures, see this Washington Post article from 2020 Jun 23:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/22/what-numbers-say-whites-blacks-live-two-different-americas/

2020-06-27

Minister's Post, Sun Jun 28

Dear Ones:

In the summer of 2017, Unitarian Universalist Association's Commission on Institutional Change began meeting. The COIC, consisting of Unitarian Universalist leaders of color, began looking carefully and soulfully into the question of how Unitarian Universalism could move forward on racial issues. Now, three years later, the COIC has issued its vitally important report: Widening the Circle of Concern.

As I write to you from the middle of this year's Generally Assembly, where considerable attention is being devoted to this report's findings and recommendations, it's clear that this report is a big deal -- because the issues it addresses are and have been big deals, even when we didn't treat them as such.

The report's Preface lists the obstacles that Unitarian Universalism faces:
• Addressing the perennial problem of race in Unitarian Universalism is not broadly seen as a theological mandate.
• No shared accountability structures and processes are in place to hold people accountable for the continued harming of Black people, Indigenous people, and people of color among us.
• The diffused nature of our organizations, each with their own accountability structures, means that ignorance and aggression are experienced again and again in different leadership contexts and as leadership changes.
• Our faith seems to have no room for repentance and saying when we have failed.
• We need new definitions of competency for religious leadership, and multicultural competency has to be part of those new standards.
• We need to both learn the lessons of history and acknowledge that these are new times.
The full report is available as a PDF HERE. Or you can order it in book form HERE.

Please read it. Let's talk about this.

Yours in faith,
Meredith

The Liberal Pulpit
Recent past services:
Apr 5: "Taking Care, Giving Care." TEXT. VIDEO.
Apr 12: "Traditions of Liberation." TEXT. VIDEO.
Apr 19: "What's Your Great Vow?" TEXT. VIDEO.
Apr 26. "Attending to the Indigenous Voice" TEXT. VIDEO.
May 3. "Transforming Your Inner Critic" TEXT. VIDEO.
May 10. "There Is No Try" TEXT. VIDEO.
May 31. "Presence in the Midst of Crisis" TEXT. VIDEO.
Jun 7. "Vision" TEXT. VIDEO.
Jun 14. "Just Love." TEXT. VIDEO.
Also find these videos, as well as videos of many other past services, at our Youtube channel: HERE

Practice of the Week: Be Glad

Category: Slogans to Live By: Carry these reminders at all times. These practices don't require setting aside a separate substantial chunk of time -- but they will slow you down a bit (and that's a good thing.) Resolve to get stronger at living by these slogans, day by day. Sometimes make one of them the focus of your daily journaling.


In order to keep our ancestors alive in harsh and often lethal settings, neural networks evolved that continually look for, react to, store, and recall bad news -- both "out there in your environment, and "in here," inside your own head.

As a consequence, we pay a lot of attention to threats, losses, and mistreatment in our environment -- and to our emotional reactions, such as worry, sadness, resentment, disappointment, and anger. We also focus on our own mistakes and flaws -- and on the feelings of guilt, shame, inadequacy, and even self-hatred that get stirred up.

There's a place for noticing and dealing with things that could harm you or others. And a place for improving your own mind and character.

But because of the negativity bias of the brain, most of us go way overboard.

Which is really unfair. It's not fair to zero in on a bit of bad news and ignore or downplay all the good news around it. The results of that unfairness include uncalled-for anxiety, pessimism, blue moods, and self-doubt. Emphasizing the bad news also primes us to be untrusting or cranky with others.

But if you compensate for the brain's bias by actively looking for good news -- especially the little things you are glad about -- then you will feel happier, more at peace with the world, more open to others, and more willing to stretch for your dreams. And as your growing gladness naturally lowers your stress, you'll likely get physical health benefits as well, such as a stronger immune system.

Now, that's good news . . . about good news!

How

Look for things to be glad about, like:
  • Bad things that never happened, or were not as bad as you feared
  • Relief that hard or stressful times are over
  • Good things that have happened to you in the past
  • Good things in your life today, such as: friends, loved ones, children, pets, the health you have, stores stocked with food, public libraries, electricity, positive aspects of your work and finances, activities you enjoy, sunsets, sunrises . . . ice cream!
  • Good things about yourself, such as positive character traits and intentions
Sink into feelings of gladness:
  • "Glad" means "pleased with" or "happy about." So notice what it feels like -- in your emotions, body, and thoughts -- to be pleased with something or happy about it. When you create a clear sense-memory of a positive mental state, you can find your way back to it again.
  • Be aware of small, subtle, mild, or brief feelings of gladness.
  • Stay with the good news. Don't change the channel so fast!
  • Notice if your feelings of gladness get hijacked by doubt or worry. Also be honest with yourself, and consider if you are kind of attached to your resentments, grievances, or "case" about other people. It's okay if it's hard for you to stay with gladness; it's really common. Just try to name to yourself what has happened in your mind -- such as "hijacking" . . . "brooding" . . . "grumbling" -- and then freely decide if you want to spiral down into the bad news, or if you want to focus on good news instead. Make a conscious decision, acknowledge it to yourself, and then act upon it.
  • Sometime every day, before going to bed, name to yourself at least three things you are glad about.
Share your feelings of gladness:
  • Make a point of mentioning to others something that you are pleased or happy about (often the little stuff of everyday life).
  • Look for opportunities to tell another person what you appreciate about him or her.
For Journaling

Above, under "look for things to be glad about," are five bullet points. Write in your journal a few examples in your life of each of the five.

* * *

Moment of Zen: The Seed of Enlightenment

We first saw Reverend Crane in #33, when the Tallspruce Community visited his Little Church in the Grotto. He then came to visit the Tallspruce gang in #107, where he asked what role God has in our practice.

Dogen describes his journey, both spiritual and geographic:
"After the aspiration for enlightenment arose, I began to search for dharma, visiting teachers at various places in our country. Then I met priest Myozen [1184-1225], of the Kennin Monastery, with whom I trained for nine years, and thus I learned a little about the teaching of the Linji School....Later I went to Great Song China, visited masters on both sides of the Zhe River, and heard the teachings of the Five Gates. Finally, I became a student of Zen master [Tiantong] Rujing [1163-1228] of Taibo Peak, and completed my life’s quest of the great matter." (Bendowa)
It begins with the arousing of an aspiration for enlightenment. But what kind of aspiration is this? Until one experiences enlightenment, one can have only deluded conceptions of what it is. Yet somehow aspiring for a deluded conception of enlightenment -- that is, aspiring for something entirely different from enlightenment -- is a necessary first step.

We have to start where we are -- with the delusions, projections, and imaginings that we have.

Case
Reverend Crane stopped by again one evening to hear one of Raven's talks. Afterward he asked, "Do I have the seed of enlightenment?"
Raven said, "You can be your best Reverend Crane."
Crane said, "Are we talking about character development?"
Raven said, "Have to start somewhere."
Crane said, "Maybe my best Crane is just something I imagine."
Raven said, "Have to start somewhere."
Verse
Where did you start?
I don't mean, in the womb,
Or the wombs of your two grandmothers,
where your parents waited to be born.
I don't mean the 64 wombs from which your fourth-great-grandparents came,
a couple centuries ago.
I don't mean the first human, first primate, first mammal, first life.
You could pick any of those, say that's where you started,
and have a good point,
But that's not what I mean.
Nor do I mean when you were four, or went to first grade,
Or turned 18.
I mean: where were you when you stepped onto the great way?
Where in your body did the cold lump of defeat weigh?
the smoldering ash of shame,
the cavity of loneliness?
Where was the clench?
stomach? shoulders? throat? chest?
Wherever it was, it reached down to your foot,
and lifted it in the direction of the path.
Wherever it was, that's where you started --
There, and where you are right now.
Case adapted from Robert Aitken; introduction and verse by Meredith Garmon
PREVIOUS   ☙   INDEX

Zen at CUUC News

E-Shrine of Vows

Check out our electronic CUUC Shrine of Vows: CLICK HERE. Eventually, these will be printed out and incorporated into a physical display. For now, draw inspiration from your fellow Community UUs by seeing what they have vowed. If you're vow isn't included, please email it Rev. Meredith at minister@cucwp.org

2020-06-19

Remember, Faultfinding Makes People Worse

Practice of the Week
Remember, Faultfinding Makes People Worse

Category: Slogans to Live By: Carry these reminders at all times. These practices don't require setting aside a separate substantial chunk of time -- but they will slow you down a bit (and that's a good thing.) Resolve to get stronger at living by these slogans, day by day. Sometimes make one of them the focus of your daily journaling.


If something is bad, it’s bad. Don’t make it worse. If someone is a difficult, troublesome person, don’t make the person worse. Don’t elaborate the person’s many faults, and don’t begin acting toward xir in such a way that those very faults will become even more severe. The opposite idea is much better: without expecting someone to be any better than he or she is, act toward the person in a way that would minimize rather than maximize the problems.

It typically happens this way: someone is nasty or difficult because xe has an (actual or metaphorical) injured limb. Naturally xe is going to act like someone with an injured limb, and this is going to cause almost everyone to look at xir and say, “You’re a really terrible person.”

Usually we won’t say this to the person directly, we’ll say it to one another, and even then it might not be direct. It may be subtle, in jokes or offhand remarks.

Even if the person never directly hears what others think of xir, xe will surely get the message strongly enough. Now the injured person recognizes, “Oh, look at the way everyone treats me. I guess I really am a terrible person. I will show them something. You thought that was bad so far? How about this!” Thus bad behavior and bad self-view are reinforced, build upon themselves, and what was bad to begin with becomes worse and worse.

The way we treat injured people is very natural and logical, but the logic is essentially faulty. Instead of noting that a terrible person is terrible and, based on this, treating him as if he were terrible, it would be much better to treat the person with tremendous kindness exactly because xe is so terrible.

We think it is natural, and emotionally true, to be kind and sweet to people who are kind and sweet and to be terrible to terrible people. But it should be just the opposite. If we have to be denigrating and mean, it is better to be denigrating and mean to kind, sweet people, because it probably won’t bother them so much; or if it does bother them, it won’t ruin them completely, because they are already kind and nice, and although they may be somewhat hurt by our disrespect, it probably won’t ruin their character.

If we are kind and sweet to someone who is terrible and who, because of being terrible, is conditioned to being treated that way, our kindness might change xir. It might surprise xir or even shock xir into better behavior.

Faultfinding makes people worse. This applies to yourself, too. If you believe you are a terrible person, and you treat myself like a terrible person, you'll become more and more terrible.

Don’t make everything so painful. When things are painful with other people or within your own mind, try to identify the actual pain and the actual problem. Then focus on that. Try not to elaborate on it with complaining or a proliferation of thinking or words and deeds that will make it worse.

Adapted from Judith Lief, "Don't Bring Things to a Painful Point"

We all have lots of faults, and it is easy to get caught up in dwelling on them. It is easy to see all the things that are wrong about everyone and everything else as well. We may feel that we are doing somebody a favor by pointing out to xir where they fall short, convincing ourselves that we are only doing so for xir own benefit. But focusing on people’s most vulnerable areas, their most painful points, can undermine their confidence and their ability to go forward. Likewise, focusing on our own faults can be equally discouraging.

What happens with this focus on the negative is that our critical attitude becomes so entrenched that we can only see what is wrong, and we become blind to what is right. By finding fault with others, we may feel good about ourselves in comparison. But in order to keep feeling good, we need to keep finding new targets for our faultfinding, in order to shore ourselves up. Deep down we do not trust ourselves, so we need to keep convincing ourselves in this way.

According to this slogan, instead of pouncing on people’s weaknesses and vulnerabilities, we should be providing encouragement and support for their strengths. That is what we should notice and point out, not just what is wrong. The idea is that it is more skillful to encourage positive qualities than to criticize what is negative. With this approach, we are not using others to heighten our own confidence nor are we undermining other people’s confidence by reminding them of their inadequacies.

Practice. Notice the quality of faultfinding, which can take place on a light level or on a more going-for-the-jugular scale. When you find yourself caught in this pattern, notice your motivation. When you have difficulty with a person, can you see beyond xir faults? Can you find a positive potential to build on, even if it seems small?

* * *

Minister's Post, Sun Jun 21

Dear Ones:

Sexual ethics isn’t just ethics for people in sexual relationships. Sexual ethics also includes obligations that everyone in a society bears to affirm for its members as sexual beings. There are claims of respect that all of us are called to honor – respect for the many forms that human sexuality may take. “Single or married, gay or straight, bisexual or ambiguously gendered, old or young, abled or challenged in the ordinary forms of sexual expression, they have claims to respect from the wider society.”

The ethic of Just Love requires not only that we bring certain principles to our own romantic and intimate relationships, but that we participate in making a society that honors and respects romantic and intimate relationships.

The principles of justice do not stop at the bedroom door. In fact, they go through that door in both directions: entering to inform the sexual encounter, and, strengthened and affirmed there, exiting to inform all our relations.

Justice, as Cornel West said, is what love looks like in public. Recognizing, however, that love can take corrupted forms – can be manipulative, domineering, and abusive -- we need to add that love must look like justice in private.

Yours in faith,
Meredith

The Liberal Pulpit
Recent past services:
Apr 5: "Taking Care, Giving Care." TEXT. VIDEO.
Apr 12: "Traditions of Liberation." TEXT. VIDEO.
Apr 19: "What's Your Great Vow?" TEXT. VIDEO.
Apr 26. "Attending to the Indigenous Voice" TEXT. VIDEO.
May 3. "Transforming Your Inner Critic" TEXT. VIDEO.
May 10. "There Is No Try" TEXT. VIDEO.
May 31. "Presence in the Midst of Crisis" TEXT. VIDEO.
Jun 7. "Vision" TEXT. VIDEO.
Jun 14. "Just Love." TEXT. VIDEO.
Also find these videos, as well as videos of many other past services, at our Youtube channel: HERE

Practice of the Week: Remember, Faultfinding Makes People Worse

Category: Slogans to Live By: Carry these reminders at all times. These practices don't require setting aside a separate substantial chunk of time -- but they will slow you down a bit (and that's a good thing.) Resolve to get stronger at living by these slogans, day by day. Sometimes make one of them the focus of your daily journaling.


If something is bad, it’s bad. Don’t make it worse. If someone is a difficult, troublesome person, don’t make the person worse. Don’t elaborate the person’s many faults, and don’t begin acting toward xir in such a way that those very faults will become even more severe. The opposite idea is much better: without expecting someone to be any better than he or she is, act toward the person in a way that would minimize rather than maximize the problems.

It typically happens this way: someone is nasty or difficult because xe has an (actual or metaphorical) injured limb. Naturally xe is going to act like someone with an injured limb, and this is going to cause almost everyone to look at xir and say, “You’re a really terrible person.”

Usually we won’t say this to the person directly, we’ll say it to one another, and even then it might not be direct. It may be subtle, in jokes or offhand remarks.

Even if the person never directly hears what others think of xir, xe will surely get the message strongly enough. Now the injured person recognizes, “Oh, look at the way everyone treats me. I guess I really am a terrible person. I will show them something. You thought that was bad so far? How about this!” Thus bad behavior and bad self-view are reinforced, build upon themselves, and what was bad to begin with becomes worse and worse.

The way we treat injured people is very natural and logical, but the logic is essentially faulty. Instead of noting that a terrible person is terrible and, based on this, treating him as if he were terrible, it would be much better to treat the person with tremendous kindness exactly because xe is so terrible.

We think it is natural, and emotionally true, to be kind and sweet to people who are kind and sweet and to be terrible to terrible people. But it should be just the opposite. If we have to be denigrating and mean, it is better to be denigrating and mean to kind, sweet people, because it probably won’t bother them so much; or if it does bother them, it won’t ruin them completely, because they are already kind and nice, and although they may be somewhat hurt by our disrespect, it probably won’t ruin their character.

If we are kind and sweet to someone who is terrible and who, because of being terrible, is conditioned to being treated that way, our kindness might change xir. It might surprise xir or even shock xir into better behavior.

Faultfinding makes people worse. This applies to yourself, too. If you believe you are a terrible person, and you treat myself like a terrible person, you'll become more and more terrible.

Don’t make everything so painful. When things are painful with other people or within your own mind, try to identify the actual pain and the actual problem. Then focus on that. Try not to elaborate on it with complaining or a proliferation of thinking or words and deeds that will make it worse.

Adapted from Judith Lief, "Don't Bring Things to a Painful Point"

We all have lots of faults, and it is easy to get caught up in dwelling on them. It is easy to see all the things that are wrong about everyone and everything else as well. We may feel that we are doing somebody a favor by pointing out to xir where they fall short, convincing ourselves that we are only doing so for xir own benefit. But focusing on people’s most vulnerable areas, their most painful points, can undermine their confidence and their ability to go forward. Likewise, focusing on our own faults can be equally discouraging.

What happens with this focus on the negative is that our critical attitude becomes so entrenched that we can only see what is wrong, and we become blind to what is right. By finding fault with others, we may feel good about ourselves in comparison. But in order to keep feeling good, we need to keep finding new targets for our faultfinding, in order to shore ourselves up. Deep down we do not trust ourselves, so we need to keep convincing ourselves in this way.

According to this slogan, instead of pouncing on people’s weaknesses and vulnerabilities, we should be providing encouragement and support for their strengths. That is what we should notice and point out, not just what is wrong. The idea is that it is more skillful to encourage positive qualities than to criticize what is negative. With this approach, we are not using others to heighten our own confidence nor are we undermining other people’s confidence by reminding them of their inadequacies.

Practice. Notice the quality of faultfinding, which can take place on a light level or on a more going-for-the-jugular scale. When you find yourself caught in this pattern, notice your motivation. When you have difficulty with a person, can you see beyond xir faults? Can you find a positive potential to build on, even if it seems small?

* * *


Moment of Zen: Impermanence

Brains were made for keeping us alive. Their capacity to imagine the future is for helping us mentally rehearse potential future situations so that we will more effectively cope, in the event something similar were to happen. It can't imagine nonexistence because its imagination exists solely to prevent nonexistence. Thus, it can only visualize situations with us -- or people we might have to deal with -- existing in them.

Through many spiritual practices, including Zen, one may come to apprehend that the self is the world. This is not imagining or visualizing, not a preparation for an eventuality of becoming the world, nor a preparation at all. It's just recognizing the fact that one's self comprises all of reality. Thus, the one who visualizes "your" futures will someday cease, but the self will continue in all its multitudinous other forms: ants, sticks, grizzly bears -- mountains, rivers, stars.

If this doesn't make sense, try being pensive beneath a starry sky for a while.

Case
One night, under the starry sky, the circle was quiet and members seemed pensive.
Badger broke the silence and said, "You know, I can't visualize myself expiring completely."
Raven said, "A ghost."
Badger said, "Even ghosts are impermanent, aren't they?"
Raven said, "Take care of your miseries now, and they won't abide."
Verse
The one who attends to misery --
My inner Kannon hearing the cries of the world --
Gathers anguish up -- a curious burden
that buoys as it freights,
and liberates as it compels --
Smelts it and blends it into my mettle.
Alloyed gold
Is more durable than the pure stuff.
Case adapted from Robert Aitken; introduction and verse by Meredith Garmon
PREVIOUS   ☙   INDEX

Zen at CUUC News

E-Shrine of Vows

Check out our electronic CUUC Shrine of Vows: CLICK HERE. Eventually, these will be printed out and incorporated into a physical display. For now, draw inspiration from your fellow Community UUs by seeing what they have vowed. If you're vow isn't included, please email it Rev. Meredith at minister@cucwp.org

2020-06-16

Music: Sun Jun 21


Mozart might have thought of it as a French folk tune, but “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star” never sounded as sweet as it does in his transformation of it. Read on for programming details.

Centering Music: Adam Kent, piano
Twelve Variations on “Ah vous dirai-je, maman?” K. 265
                                    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

2020-06-11

This Week in Religious Education: June 11-18, 2020

*|MC:SUBJECT|*
Religious Education & Faith Development
Community Unitarian Universalist Congregation at White Plains
June 11, 2020

 

Center Lane & PrideWorks
Pride Month
Online Workshops 
  • Friday June 16 at 6:30pm - Staying Healthy in a Healthy Relationship with Stephanie Arrango
  • Tuesday, June 23 at 6:30pm - Queer-Positive Stories in the Bible: Christian and Jewish Scripture for Liberation - with Pastor Jim O'Hanlon, Rabbi Ben Goldberg, and Rev. Kathy Genus
  • Friday, June 30 at 6:30pm - Take a Giant Step with MSP - Challenging Gender Norms and Boxes while having fun and staying healthy with Kathryn Strangolagalli

Center Lane LGBTQ+
Online Pride Camps 
Center Lane is celebrating its 25th birthday with 3 LGBTQ+ Pride Camps! Pride Camps are FREE 5-day leadership conferences where teens in Westchester County can earn 20 hours of community service learning how to create community, connect with LGBTQ+ culture and history and contribute to the world! Westchester UU youth have attended these camps in the past and loved them - ask Tracy!

Pride Camp: Rainbow Pride!
Monday-Friday, June 22-26, 11am-3pm
What exactly is LGBTQ+ culture? We’ll explore the differences between sexual orientation and gender identity and what all the letters in the QuILTBAG mean to the world and ourselves. We’ll take a trip through LGBTQ+ history and check out how our community and history have been presented on TV, movies, theatre, and YouTube

Pride Camp: Friendship & Dating & Sex, Oh My!
Monday-Friday, July 13-17, 11am-3pm
Finding and building relationships is unique for LGBTQ+ youth. Coming out, rejection, and (sometimes) unexpected crushes can be part of it. The straight world gives us much of the script for dating, so it’s hard to know how it all works - or where even to find someone! In most sex ed lessons, we’re either terrified or invisible. Here we’ll talk about all kinds of healthy, safe relationships.


Pride Camp: Isms & Intersections
Monday-Friday, August 10-14, 11am-3pm
The LGBTQ+ community is made up of people of all genders, races, religions, abilities, ages, income levels - we're everyone! This week, we'll talk 'ism' - how oppression of groups affects us personally, others in our community, and how we talk about being Queer. We'll explore how we navigate intersecting identities, deal with oppression, and show resilience.

 
Our Graduating Seniors
Need Your Words of Encouragement 
 
This is a challenging year to finish high school and step from youth into young adulthood. Let our seniors know they have a faith community that loves and supports them. 
Submit a short note to be included in hymnals gifted by the congregation. These hymnals will be an enduring reminder of beloved music, words and community. We will celebrate Bridging for 4 youth next Sunday, June 21st: Evan Cacchione, Niall Ryan, Oliver Schwartz, Aiden Breneman-Pennas. Click HERE to submit your note of congratulations and encouragement.  
This Sunday in RE
Exploring Current Events &
Grounding Racial Justice
in Our UU Values
10:00-10:45am, 4th-5th grade final Bibleodeon class plus a conversation about current events and racial justice with Janice Silverberg & Ted Kuczinski (Room 2210)

11:20am-12:00pm, K-3rd grade affirmation of our UU Principles and values related to dignity, participation and fairness with Laura Goodspeed, Jim Cobb & Joe Gonzalez. They will read "Peaceful Fights for Equal Rights" by Rob Sanders and look at the Racial Transformer poster from Colorlines.org to talk about different types of action people take.  (Room 8428, breakout space)

11:30am-12:30pm, 6th-7th grade final World Religions class about Buddhism plus a conversation about current events and racial justice with Rev. Meredith and Gail Johnston (Room 8428, breakout space)

11:40am-12:40pm 8th-12th grade Youth Group conversation about current events and racial justice with Tracy Breneman, Jeff Tomlinson, Cyndi & Daniel Tillman (Room 8428, breakout space)

1:30-2:30pm Parent/Grandparent/Caregiver/Friend exploring how adults can have conversations with the children and youth in your life about current events and racial justice, with Tracy B & guest in Room 8428. If you are coming with specific questions or needs, you are welcome to e-mail them ahead to Tracy. You might take a look at these materials ahead of our conversation: 
Resources for Youth and Adults:  Resources for Children:
Click HERE for our growing collection of resources.
The 1619 Project at CUUC
To understand current demands for racial justice, we need to truly understand our country's history. CUUC discussions about The 1619 Project will resume in the fall. Read about CUUC's approach HERE.  Summer is a great time to read the materials! Links to the individual essays on The New York Times website can be found at the bottom of their article "Why We Published the 1619 Project." Find a link to The New York Times Magazine: The 1619 Project HERE
Worship: Sunday, June 14, 2020

Just Love
Rev. Meredith Garmon

9:50am Centering Music
10:10am Welcome, 
Room ending 1991  
After Worship Virtual Coffee Hour
RE Classes and Groups Meet - See Schedule Above

Zoom Rooms
Visit cucwp.org/calendar and click on an event for login information.
Check the Online Programming Schedule for details.
To reserve a Zoom online meeting rooms, contact admin@cucwp.org.
 

ONLINE MEETING ROOMS
Community Unitarian Universalist Congregation at White Plains  
468 Rosedale Ave · White Plains, NY 10605-5419






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