CUUC

CUUC

2018-04-12

RE News: Sun Apr 15

Lifespan Religious Education
What could be more appropriate during the month of faith at CUUC than attending Faith Development Friday? Last month's gathering had 40 attendees, as Rev. Meredith facilitated the third session of Faith Like a River and our Family Journey Group continued. The Unitarian Universalist concept of faith is an ongoing action of discernment and discovery, in which knowledge and questioning add to the strength of our personal life compass. "Faithing," as James Fowler calls it, "is a process of wrestling meaning from life and subjecting it again and again to the scrutiny of our minds, the leap of our hearts, and the reality of action." RSVP to join us for some faithing this Fri or again on May 18.

Please see the following seven (7) announcements:

1) This Sun Apr 15
K-5th grade start in Fellowship Hall for Children's Worship that includes rehearsal of Sakura for the May 6 Flower Service.
6th-12th grade start in classrooms.

Classes
Pre-K-1 - Creating Home: Muhammad
2nd-3rd - Passport to Spirituality: England (Unitarian Universalism: Kindness to All Beings)
4th-5th - Bibleodeon: Jesus's Parables & Miracles
6th-7th – Neighboring Faiths: Buddhism Intro
8th-9th – Coming of Age: Faith Statements
10th-12th – Youth Group: Con Planning

To view the Religious Education Google calendar, CLICK HERE.
To view a spreadsheet version of the RE Calendar, CLICK HERE.

2) Faith Development Friday - Apr 13
An evening of learning, spiritual growth, and community
RSVP by 3pm to cuucevents@gmail.com

6:15pm Pizza & Salad Community Dinner
7:00pm Programs Begin...

Faith Like a River
The Wisdom RE Ministry Team invites you to an Adult RE experience facilitated by Rev. Meredith. This class explores the people, ideas, and movements that have shaped our faith heritage. What lessons do the stories of our history teach that can help us live more faithfully in the present? What lessons do they offer to be lived into the future? You may also join this program online via Zoom videoconferencing by going to https://zoom.us/j/2898507899.

Family Journey Group
Parents gather to discuss the theme of faith (facilitated by Barbara Montrose), while children have their own group with activities and discussion based on the theme (facilitated by Perry Montrose, DLRE). Adults without children are invited to participate in the parents’ group.

Youth Group Movie Night
Join us for a night of fun with fellow high schoolers and bring a friend!

Social Time for Adults
Those who would like more time to chat and just be together are welcome to continue hanging out in Fellowship Hall after the meal. Come to simply get to know your fellow CUUCers better, without specific programming.

Also stay for coffee and conversation after the programs.

3) UU Common Read Discussion Sun Apr 15, 11:40
Hosted by CUUC Wisdom Reading and Discussion Group

We will discuss Daring Democracy: Igniting Power, Meaning, and Connection for the America We Want, one of the two books selected for this year’s Common Read. This optimistic book is for Americans who are asking, in the wake of Trump's victory, What do we do now? The answer: We need to organize and fight to protect and expand our democracy.

Facilitated by Rev. Meredith and Sabrina Cleary (clearytheory@gmail.com).

4) Let's Play
Sun Apr 15, 1-3pm, Ethical Culture Society, White Plains
Children of all ages are invited to an afternoon of street games and activities. Free. ECSW is a participating congregation in the Council for New Americans and would love to meet all the refugee families that have recently settled in the county. Please spread the word—and bring your family, too! Contact: Sabine Salandy, director of education (SabineSalandy@ethicalculturesocietywestchester.org). FLYER FOUND HERE.

5) Bingo Night!
April 27 at 6:30
A night of pizza and community fun!
Help us out by donating a gift to our collection of prizes.
All ages welcome! $5/adult; $3/child; $15/family max.
RSVP: cuucevents@gmail.com

6) The 6th Annual Variety Show is Coming!
Sat May 12, 5pm
(pizza for performers at 4:30pm)

Rehearsal - Fri, May 11, 4:30-7pm
(snacks provided)

Proceeds from this year's show will go to:
The New American Children’s Cultural Enrichment Fund.
This fund gives the children of refugees in Westchester County the opportunities they have not had to play sports, attend performances, or explore the arts.

DECIDE HOW YOU WILL PARTICIPATE.
  • Perform - contact Liz at elizabethsuvanto@hotmail.com
  • Bake - contact Erin at fosterblatt@gmail.com
  • Submit Recipes – contact Irene at irene.cox@gmail.com
  • Include 1 recipe with your own introduction/description/story (up to 200 words) and a photo of you/your family in the kitchen or elsewhere
  • Donate Raffle Prizes - contact Liz at elizabethsuvanto@hotmail.com
  • (previous prizes: restaurant gift certificates, bouquets of flowers, wine, movie gift cards, games for kids (new only), chocolate and many more. If you are soliciting donations from local businesses, a letter explaining the background of the show and CUUC can be FOUND HERE.)
The Variety Show is not just for children to partake in - this is for EVERYONE AND ANYONE AT CUUC, and other local UU congregations, and your friends outside of CUUC!

7) UU Summer Camps & Retreat Centers for Children, Youth, and Families
Unitarian Universalist retreat centers offer the opportunity to connect with UUs from around the country in fun and fellowship. Whether you are looking for a place to go as a family or somewhere for your kids to experience a fun camp, there are many amazing Unitarian Universalist summer destinations:

Ferry Beach is oceanfront in ME.
ferrybeach.org
The Mountain is atop the Blue Ridge Mountains in NC.
mountaincenters.org
The Rowe Center is in the Berkshire Mountains in MA.
rowecenter.org
Sophia Fahs RE Camp is one week in August on Shelter Island.
www.liacuu.org/Fahs
Star Island is a 46-acre island off the NH coast.
starisland.org
Unirondack is in the NY Adirondacks.
unirondack.org
Murray Grove is a Universalist retreat center nearby in NJ.
http://www.murraygrove.org/#!camping-in-the-grove/c15no
UUMAC Retreat is one week in July at DeSales University in PA.
uumac.org
The Central East Region offers a Summer Institute focused on climate change.
http://omdsi.org/
SUUSI is a weeklong multignerational event in North Carolina.
https://www.suusi.org/

Sincerely,
Perry
Director of Lifespan Religious Education and Faith Development

Recommended Reading

Centering is one of our Common Reads (see HERE).

Chandeerah Davis (CUUC Youth Advisor) and Jeff Tomlinson (of the Social Justice Coordinating Committee) especially encourage all members to read Centering. Come to the discussion session about Centering after the service on Sun Apr 22 if you can -- but read the book even if you can't come to the discussion.

And if you can't read much of the book, Chandeerah and Jeff especially encourage reading these passages:

from Rev. Darrick Jackson:
"The intellectualism in Unitarian Universalism comes with a culture of stillness. We are expected to sit quietly in our seats, listen intently with no emotion on our faces, no movement in our bodies. We are supposed to wait until after the service to express ourselves. I grew up in a culture of engagement. We had permission to respond to the service, to say Amen when we were moved by the words or music, to clap our hands and smile and nod our heads whenever the spirit moved us. We lived the hymn "When the Spirit Says Do" every time we gathered for worship. I have had to learn to restrain myself in UU circles, which distances me from the worship. Sometimes our worship feels more like a lecture to me. The first time I preached at a UU congregation, I was unsure of how my sermon was being received because there was no visible response. It wasn't until after the service that I learned that people did enjoy the sermon. Even now, I get slightly unnerved by the lack of response. I construct my services with UU stillness in mind; any attempt at a more embodied worship feels experimental and risky instead of one of many ways worship happens. I have always loved youth and young adult worship, as those services are generally more heart- and soul-centered and invite engagement and connection.
Engaging UUs in conversation about these areas where I feel disconnected from the UU culture is hard. I often struggle with how to say something, or if it is worth it. I worry about the other person's reaction, and I have to decide if I have the energy to deal with it. Often when I engage with someone about these matters, the conversation quickly turns to them (how they feel about it, how they are not to blame, and so on); instead of engaging the issue, I'm engaging their needs."
from Rev. Lilia Cuervo:
"Once I liberate my mind, my body feels free to move, to clap, to feel alive during worship. My heart aches seeing so many people in our pews restraining their desire to give in to joy through movement, frozen by fear of judgment. That is why, in my first sermon at First Parish in Cambridge, I promised that sooner or later I would have them dancing. I fulfilled my promise, and it was a happy day for me when, during a Day of the Dead service, five couples spontaneously, one by one, proceeded to dance in the aisles to the mariachi music.
Just by being present, a minister of color not only changes the makeup of a congregation but, if allowed to exercise leadership, helps over time to create an environment in which transformation can happen in small and big ways."

From the Minister, Sun Apr 15

Coupla things:

First, we have an extra-special Earth Day service on Apr 22. It's a joint service bringing together at CUUC all five of the Westchester UU congregations (Hastings, Croton, Mt. Kisco, Mohegan Lake, and us!) All five ministers will have roles, and a combined choir will sing. I'm very excited!

Second, I'm looking for a person or two who has some expertise in Parliamentary Procedure -- Robert's Rules or alternative. A subcommittee of our Board is exploring options for rules of procedure. Can you help?

Glad to see April finally beginning to warm up a little bit!

In love,
Meredith

In case you missed it . . .

Here's a small part of the Apr 8 Passover Seder service:



The Liberal Pulpit. The Liberal Pulpit is a YouTube Channel HERE! Videos include the sermons starting on Feb 25.

Index of past sermons: HERE. Index of other reflections: HERE.







Practice of the Week. Ecospiritual #5: Cogs in the Machine. Too many negative headlines about the environment can cause people to disengage from the debate altogether, believing that it is entirely beyond our control and influence. However, despite the risk of disengagement on the part of some, the first step toward recovering from our collective addiction to consumptive and polluting culture is recognition of the extent of our powerlessness.





Your Moment of Zen. Ordinary Morality. Porcupine came by one day looking troubled. Raven called down to her from the tall spruce. "What's up, Porcupine?" Porcupine said, "I'm hearing rumors from my old friends that Coyote Roshi is violating even ordinary morality." Raven flew down to her side and said, "She has this urge to prey on newborn lambs." READ MORE...

Zen Practice at CUUC: Sat Apr 14




Minister's Tuesday Coffee Chat. I'm at a coffee shop (almost) every Tuesday from 3-5pm. I invite you to drop by and chat.
Apr: Barnes and Noble Cafe, Vernon Hills Shopping Center, Eastchester
May: Red Mango, 1924 Palmer Ave, Larchmont. (A departure from coffee -- let's try a fruit smoothie!)






NOTES
  • The two Common Reads for 2017-18: HERE.
  • Of particular note, regarding Centering: See recommended reading HERE.
  • On the Journey, April: Faith. HERE.
  • Sun Apr 29. A SPECIAL CONGREGATIONAL MEETING HAS BEEN CALLED to vote on the proposal that Community Unitarian Universalist Congregation takes the following Position on Escalating Economic Inequity . . . read the position HERE -- it's about a 10-minute read.

    This Week's e-Communitarian

    R.E. News: Apr 8

    Music: Apr 8

Cogs in the Machine

Practice of the Week
Ecospiritual #5: Cogs in the Machine

Category: Ecospiritual. These practices are oriented toward developing our spirituality through our connection with our planet home and our responsibility to care for it.


Part of coming face to face with reality is realizing how much of our collective situation is truly out of individual control. We live embedded within systems over which we have no power. We are citizens of a country whose government may do things – wage war, impose taxes, pass laws – with which we disagree. We may protest or work to elect people whose actions may better reflect our own opinions, but there is a limit to our influence, individually or as a group. Even if we dedicate our lives to a particular cause, there are a thousand other equally worthy causes that won’t receive our attention.

Every aspect of our lives – the food we eat, the cars we drive, the places we work, even the toilets we flush – has an impact on the environment, and precious little is within any appreciable individual control.

This can be disheartening and result in apathy. Too many negative headlines about the environment can cause people to disengage from the debate altogether, believing that it is entirely beyond our control and influence. However, despite the risk of disengagement on the part of some, the first step toward recovering from our collective addiction to consumptive and polluting culture is recognition of the extent of our powerlessness.

Consider this story: Once upon a time, “Mr. Green” wanted to live an eco-friendly lifestyle. He worked for Giant Megacorp Industries and wasn’t very happy about it, but he had children to support and jobs are hard to come by, so off to work he went. He recycled all he could at home and made sacrifices to save money for solar panels on his house. But he still worked for GMI and felt he couldn’t afford to quit. One day, GMI sent Mr. Green across the country on a big jet plane to an important convention where they served him factory-farmed food for his dinner. Every day, he handed out free goodies made of plastic to potential clients. He stayed at a Big Fancy Hotel where they changed his sheets and towels even when he told them not to do it. Mr. Green went home after the convention feeling guilty. He wanted to hep GMI become more eco-friendly, but his boss, Mr. Bigshot, didn’t care.

Sound familiar? There are thousands of Mr. and Ms. Greens out there today, doing the best they can in the real circumstances of their lives. We can accomplish a lot through individual choices, but we need to be aware of systems that are beyond our control. To change them, we may need to change laws, but more importantly we need to change the culture as a whole.

Decades ago, heavy smoking was commonplace. It was sophisticated and sexy. Today, non-smoking is the norm in the US and Europe. Why the change? Studies convincingly demonstrated the health harms of smoking, and laws were slowly changed accordingly. More important was the change that took place in the culture. Smoking is no longer the mark of glamour or status it once was. Attitudes shifted.

To change the Earth-destroying systems that are beyond our control, we need to experience a soul-deep cultural attitude shift and rediscover the sacredness of the Earth. We have the scientific understanding – but attitudes have not yet substantially shifted. Planet-destroying, do-what-I-want attitudes will need to give way to Earth-restoring behavior the same way that smoke-filled offices gave way to cleaner indoor air. Facing up to the way things really are is a critical first step toward making the deep changes our society so desperately needs.

Practices

1. The Roller Coaster. When you have some time when you won’t be disturbed, imagine you are getting into a roller coaster. As you visualize, engage your whole body. You sit, and the bar comes down. You’re strapped in. As the coaster begins to move, you realize there’s no turning back. Imagine yourself on the slow, jerky climb, the stomach-churning downward rush, the wind in your hair, the twists and turns. Now, imagine that instead of stopping, the ride keeps on going, on and on. You feel queasy, but people around you seem to be having fun. You can’t get off. Slowly, one by one, others start to feel sick like you do, and together you shout to the people in the control booth. Ride the coaster in your mind a while and think about all that is out of your control. The coaster is our culture. Are we shouting yet?

2. Ritual of Release. Obtain a fireproof bowl and at least a dozen slips of paper. Place the bowl on your altar, and over the course of a week or so, write down some of the Earth-threatening things that are out of your control. For example, you might write “illegal logging in the rainforest,” or “overfishing the world’s oceans.” As the bowl fills over the course of the week, spend a few minutes each day just being at your altar. Sit beside it and contemplate all that is implied by the items in the bowl. After a week, take the bowl outside and carefully burn the papers, symbolically releasing what you cannot control. Add the ashes to your garden.

Group Activities

Group Ritual of Release. Ask each group member to write down one example of threats to the Earth that are beyond the group’s control and add it to a large bowl. Spend some time sharing as a group, then take the bowl outside and burn the papers. Invite everyone to sit in silence for a while.

Questions for Group Conversation:
  • Have you every felt swept up by circumstances beyond your control? Is this experience a product of contemporary culture?
  • Have you ever consciously done something harmful to the Earth simply because it was easy? Did you feel guilty afterwards?
  • What charitable organizations do you support. What can you do to help their work?
  • What is it about the system of government under which you live (national, state, local) that makes it difficult to bring about cultural change?

* * *

Previous Ecospiritual Practice: 4. How Much Is Enough?

2018-04-11

Music: Sun Apr 15

Solo piano works by female composers are featured in the morning’s Centering Music and Offertory, in an attempt to give voice to the creativity of artists frequently overshadowed by their male colleagues and family members. Many of Fanny Mendelssohn’s works were originally published under her brother Felix’s name, and Clara Wieck Schumann aborted her own trajectory as a composer in favor of promoting her husband Robert’s piano music. French composer Cecile Chaminade, a gay woman, was by contrast a more independent figure, whose “Scarf Dance” has been a favorite among pianists for many generations. Amy Marcy Beach, known more popularly by her married name Mrs. H. H. A. Beach, was a prodigiously gifted pianist who is considered one of the great composers of America’s Second New England School, which flourished in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Soprano Kim Force is also on hand with two moving selections offered in solidarity with the Me Too movement.

Read on for programming details.

Centering Music: Adam Kent, piano
Mélodie, Op. 4, No. 2
                                    Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel
Sérénade, Op. 29
Pièce Romantique, Op. 9, No. 1
                                    Cécile Chaminade
Mazurka, Op. 6, No. 3
                                    Clara Wieck Schumann
With Dog Teams, Op. 64, No. 4
                                    Mrs. H. H. A. Beach

Opening Music: Kim Force, soprano
Silent All These Years                        
                                                Tori Amos

Offertory:
Scarf Dance, Op. 37, No. 3
                                           Chaminade

Interlude: Chris Force, piano
Til It Happens To You
                                                Diane Warren and Stefani Germanotta



2018-04-05

From the Minister, Sun Apr 8

With April Fool's Day just past, I reflect on the foolishness of Unitarian Universalism. We UUs are so foolish as to say that religion is not about beliefs. That’s why I argue that we are not agnostic, and that we misunderstand our own religiousness when we say we are. “I’m agnostic,” is the answer only if the question is “What do you believe about God?” Or, “What do you believe about the soul, in particular, its prospects for an afterlife?” But we’re there with our silly jester’s cap and wand (and chalice) saying, “But that’s not the question.” In the Tarot deck, the wizard card represents the one who knows the answers. The fool card represents the one who keeps changing the question. That's us!

St. Paul, I think, took a wrong turn when he cast Christianity as fundamentally about what one believed. For us Unitarian Universalists the question is not what shall we believe, but how shall we live? Who shall we live with in community? And, those moments we’ve had of mystery and wonder, glimpses of eternal goodness, transcendent oneness, what shall we make of those? How can the power of such radically nonsensical flashes be integrated with our daily life? Those are our questions.

The answer isn’t one that can be spoken or written down but must be lived out. So we come here, come together once a week to light some candles, share of ourselves, sing some songs, hear and consider a sermon, center ourselves on what is important, worship in the sense of worth-shape, give shape to what has deepest worth in our lives.

Since it is in our relationships that we find who and what we are in the vast web of reality, we come here to live by a covenant for how we relate to each other. Within our relationships as Unitarian Universalists, we can come to spiritual depth and wisdom and find the grace to walk on this planet fruitfully rather than destructively. We mutually agree to strive for authenticity and honesty together amidst mutual respect and care. We share not a belief, but an attitude, a faith that life is good, that justice is attainable, that caring redeems us, and that joy is one another’s company.

In love,
Meredith

In case you missed it . . .

Here's the sermon of Sun Apr 1:



New on The Liberal Pulpit. The Liberal Pulpit is a YouTube Channel HERE! Videos include the sermons starting on Feb 25.

This week's posts on "The Liberal Pulpit":
"An April Fool's Easter"

Index of past sermons: HERE. Index of other reflections: HERE.




Practice of the Week. Notice You're All Right Right Now. Look again at the thin slice of time that is the present. In this moment: Are you basically okay? Is breathing okay? Is the heart beating? Is the mind working? The answers are almost certainly yes. In daily life, it's possible to access this fundamental sense of all-rightness even while getting things done. You're not ignoring real threats or issues, or pretending that everything is perfect. It's not. But in the middle of everything, you can usually see that you're actually all right right now.



Your Moment of Zen. Zazen in the Forest. It had been stormy for several days, and the community did not meet. Finally, the winds calmed, the rains stopped, and the meetings resumed. Owl obviously wanted to speak, so the others deferred. "I've been told," she said, "that long ago, folks could devote themselves full-time to the practice, and enlightened masters emerged. Nowadays here in the forest, folks are so busy hunting and gleaning and protecting themselves that they have very little time for zazen. How can we hope to attain the level of realization the old masters attained?" Raven said, "They saw plum blossoms; we hear the robin." READ MORE...

Zen Practice at CUUC: Sat Apr 7

Minister's Tuesday Coffee Chat. I'm at a coffee shop (almost) every Tuesday from 3-5pm. I invite you to drop by and chat.
Apr: Barnes and Noble Cafe, Vernon Hills Shopping Center, Eastchester
May: Red Mango, 1924 Palmer Ave, Larchmont. (A departure from coffee -- let's try a fruit smoothie!)



NOTES
  • The two Common Reads for 2017-18: HERE
  • On the Journey, March: Wandering. HERE.
  • Sun Apr 29. A SPECIAL CONGREGATIONAL MEETING HAS BEEN CALLED to vote on the proposal that Community Unitarian Universalist Congregation takes the following Position on Escalating Economic Inequity . . . read the position HERE -- it's about a 10-minute read.

    Or, if you like, you can listen to me read it out loud. (About 19 minutes, out loud.)


This Week's e-Communitarian

R.E. News: Apr 8

Music: Apr 8

RE News: Sun Apr 8

Lifespan Religious Education
After finding the hidden afikomen (Passover matzoh) on Fri, doing an Easter egg hunt at my wife Barbara’s workplace on Sat, and joining the CUUC Easter egg hunt on Sun, our daughter Nora arrived at Aunt Donna’s house Sun night to find an Easter basket prepared with goodies and blurted out, “Oh no! Not again.” You might feel this way when you think about celebrating Passover this Sun, but you will find our Passover Service to be interactive, interesting, and fun for all ages. It will be good to honor this important holiday in our congregation. We are bringing the elements of a Passover Seder into our regular Sunday service, with a meal to follow, so it is accessible to everyone. There will be explanations of the rituals to go with the readings, songs, and matzoh breaking. I look forward to sharing this with you on Sunday.

Please see the following seven (7) announcements:

1) This Sun Apr 8
Passover Service and Meal
All ages are in the sanctuary for this interactive multigen service. (Childcare is available for those who need it.)

Learn about and celebrate Passover, the important holiday about freedom, through our regular service that will contain Passover Seder elements and seat us all at tables in the sanctuary. The meal will follow the service in the sanctuary and close with the children's search for the afikomen (matzoh hunt) and a final blessing.

If you would like to help with the Passover cooking on Sat or serving and cleanup on Sun, please email me at dlre@cucwp.org.

To view the Religious Education Google calendar, CLICK HERE.
To view a spreadsheet version of the RE Calendar, CLICK HERE.

2) Faith Development Friday - Apr 13
An evening of learning, spiritual growth, and community
RSVP to cuucevents@gmail.com

6:15pm Pizza & Salad Community Dinner
7:00pm Programs Begin...

Faith Like a River
The Wisdom RE Ministry Team invites you to an Adult RE experience facilitated by Rev. Meredith. This class explores the people, ideas, and movements that have shaped our faith heritage. What lessons do the stories of our history teach that can help us live more faithfully in the present? What lessons do they offer to be lived into the future? You may also join this program online via Zoom videoconferencing by going to https://zoom.us/j/2898507899.

Family Journey Group
Parents gather to discuss the theme of faith (facilitated by Barbara Montrose), while children have their own group with activities and discussion based on the theme (facilitated by Perry Montrose, DLRE). Adults without children are invited to participate in the parents’ group.

Youth Group Social Night
Join us for a night of fun with fellow high schoolers and bring a friend!

Social Time for Adults
Those who would like more time to chat and just be together are welcome to continue hanging out in Fellowship Hall after the meal. Come to simply get to know your fellow CUUCers better, without specific programming.

Also stay for coffee and conversation after the programs.

3) UU Common Read Discussion Sun Apr 15, 11:40
Hosted by CUUC Wisdom Reading and Discussion Group

We will discuss Daring Democracy: Igniting Power, Meaning, and Connection for the America We Want, one of the two books selected for this year’s Common Read. This optimistic book is for Americans who are asking, in the wake of Trump's victory, What do we do now? The answer: We need to organize and fight to protect and expand our democracy.

Facilitated by Rev. Meredith and Sabrina Cleary (clearytheory@gmail.com).

4) Let's Play
Sun Apr 15, 1-3pm, Ethical Culture Society, White Plains
Children of all ages are invited to an afternoon of street games and activities. Free. ECSW is a participating congregation in the Council for New Americans and would love to meet all the refugee families that have recently settled in the county. Please spread the word—and bring your family, too! Contact: Sabine Salandy, director of education (SabineSalandy@ethicalculturesocietywestchester.org). FLYER FOUND HERE.

5) Save the Date for Bingo!
April 27 at 6:30
A night of pizza and community fun!
Help us out by donating a gift to our collection of prizes.
All ages welcome! $5/adult; $3/child; $15/family max.
RSVP: cuucevents@gmail.com

6) The 6th Annual Variety Show is Coming!
Sat May 12, 5pm
(pizza for performers at 4:30pm)

Rehearsal - Fri, May 11, 4:30-7pm
(snacks provided)

Proceeds from this year's show will go to:
The New American Children’s Cultural Enrichment Fund.
This fund gives the children of refugees in Westchester County the opportunities they have not had to play sports, attend performances, or explore the arts.

DECIDE HOW YOU WILL PARTICIPATE.
  • Perform - contact Liz at elizabethsuvanto@hotmail.com
  • Bake - contact Erin at fosterblatt@gmail.com
  • Submit Recipes – contact Irene at irene.cox@gmail.com
  • Include 1 recipe with your own introduction/description/story (up to 200 words) and a photo of you/your family in the kitchen or elsewhere
  • Donate Raffle Prizes - contact Liz at elizabethsuvanto@hotmail.com
  • (previous prizes: restaurant gift certificates, bouquets of flowers, wine, movie gift cards, games for kids (new only), chocolate and many more. If you are soliciting donations from local businesses, a letter explaining the background of the show and CUUC can be FOUND HERE.)
The Variety Show is not just for children to partake in - this is for EVERYONE AND ANYONE AT CUUC, and other local UU congregations, and your friends outside of CUUC!

7) UU Summer Camps & Retreat Centers for Children, Youth, and Families
Unitarian Universalist retreat centers offer the opportunity to connect with UUs from around the country in fun and fellowship. Whether you are looking for a place to go as a family or somewhere for your kids to experience a fun camp, there are many amazing Unitarian Universalist summer destinations:

Ferry Beach is oceanfront in ME.
ferrybeach.org
The Mountain is atop the Blue Ridge Mountains in NC.
mountaincenters.org
The Rowe Center is in the Berkshire Mountains in MA.
rowecenter.org
Sophia Fahs RE Camp is one week in August on Shelter Island.
www.liacuu.org/Fahs
Star Island is a 46-acre island off the NH coast.
starisland.org
Unirondack is in the NY Adirondacks.
unirondack.org
Murray Grove is a Universalist retreat center nearby in NJ.
http://www.murraygrove.org/#!camping-in-the-grove/c15no
UUMAC Retreat is one week in July at DeSales University in PA.
uumac.org
The Central East Region offers a Summer Institute focused on climate change.
http://omdsi.org/
SUUSI is a weeklong multignerational event in North Carolina.
https://www.suusi.org/

Sincerely,
Perry
Director of Lifespan Religious Education and Faith Development

2018-04-04

Music: Sun Apr 8


Passover, which commemorates the Jewish exodus from slavery in Egypt, has engendered a wealth of traditional, liturgical, and programmatic music, examples of which are featured in this morning’s musical selections. In addition, the theme of liberation has resonated with oppressed peoples ever since Old Testament times, and a number of African-American Spirituals speak to an identification with historic Jewish struggles.

French composer Charles Valentin Alkan (1813-1888) was an observant Jew, who is purported to have perished when he reached for a volume of the Talmud and toppled an entire bookcase! His paraphrase of the 137th Psalm recalls another period of exile during biblical times. Read on for highlights of musical works to be performed as well as a translation of the 137th Psalm.

Centering Music: Adam Kent, piano
Wade in the Water
                                    Traditional Spiritual, arr. by Samuel Coleridge-Taylor
Super Flumina Babylonis (Psalm 137)*
                                                            Charles Valentin Alkan

Special Music: Kim Force, soprano
There’s No Seder Like Our Seder
                                    Irving Berlin

Other Holiday-themed songs include:
Go Down Moses, Dayeinu, Soon the Day Will Arrive, Chad Gadya, and Shalom Chaverim



Psalm 137
By the rivers of Babylon we sat and wept
    when we remembered Zion.
There on the poplars
    we hung our harps,
for there our captors asked us for songs,
    our tormentors demanded songs of joy;
    they said, “Sing us one of the songs of Zion!”
How can we sing the songs of the Lord
    while in a foreign land?
If I forget you, Jerusalem,
    may my right hand forget its skill.
May my tongue cling to the roof of my mouth
    if I do not remember you,
if I do not consider Jerusalem
    my highest joy.
Remember, Lord, what the Edomites did
    on the day Jerusalem fell.
“Tear it down,” they cried,

    “tear it down to its foundations!”
Daughter Babylon, doomed to destruction,
    happy is the one who repays you
    according to what you have done to us.
Happy is the one who seizes your infants
    and dashes them against the rocks.